Tuesday, November 01, 2005

Farm Stations?


America was once blanketed in what we now quaintly call "Farm Stations" Pictures explain as much as words can in this case. They are very rural, always located in small towns. The bulk of the ramaining two dozen farm stations are in America's bread basket: Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri... I can only think of one that has even tertiary coverage of a major markets. That ont happens to be KMZU which skirts Kansas City to the East. http://www.kmzu.com/ They play country or country oldies music, maybe some big band if they play music at all. They all run livestock prices, and both the Chicago and Kansas City board of trade reports. I'd bet money that better than 50% run the Paul Harvey show. Many run local programs for trading or selling goods over the air, like a live auction or a broadcast classifieds column. The programming is almost always home-grown, and usually live. It's the way radio used to be. Everything about these stations reminds me of the 1950s.

And as hokey and corny as this format sounds it's pretty entertaining. The DJs are local, and colorful. The jokes old, overused yet sincere. It's never harshly political, or shocking. They know the names of all their callers and often recognize their voices. They broadcast local highschool football games. If you call the request line, odds are in favor of you hearing your phone ring in the radio and the DJ answering mid-sentance.

Last year the last Farm Station on the East Coast went gospel. Try to appreciate what's left friends. Below is a fairly complete list of these last suvivors.

FM's
KAAN-AM 870 /95.5
KBKH 92.9
KMZU 100.7
WRCO 100.9


AM's
KAOL-AM 1430
KASM-AM 1150
KBEW-AM 1560
KBHB-AM 810
KDHL-AM 920
KFRM-AM 550
KFTM-AM 1400
KNEB-AM 960
KQLX-AM 890
KRVN-AM 880
KSIR-AM 1010
KTIC-AM 840
KVSH-AM 940
KXXX-AM 790
KZZN-AM 1490
WCAZ-AM 990
WCPH-AM 1220
WELD-AM 690
WWIC-AM 1050
WZTQ-AM 1560

And don't ignore the Farm hams of America.
http://www.rf.org/